Marshmallow Althaea officinalis Edible Perennial

Marshmallow Althaea officinalis Edible Perennial

Marshmallow Althaea officinalis is an edible perennial plant that may have medicinal properties, can be cultivated, but also grows wild in the US.


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My Experience

I do not have a lot of experience growing this herb yet.  I was in a Permaculture Design Class (PDC) this past fall and one of the people there was an herbalist.  She had a number of packets of seeds for sale and marshmallow was one of them.  She explained to us what the seeds were and some of the benefits so I had to buy them.  Below I will explain a little about this plant and will follow up later this year on how they did.

The Basics

Marshmallow Althaea officinalis Edible Perennial

Marshmallow Althaea officinalis Edible Perennial

Marshmallow has a botanical name of Althaea officinalis. The generic name, Althaea, is derived from the Greek, altho (to cure), from its healing properties.  It is a green perennial that is hardy in zones 3 through 9 and likes partial shade to full sun.  They grow in clumps about 4 feet tall and about 2 1/2 feet wide, with maple-like leaves. It’s soft, hairy leaves are deeply cut in 3 divisions, similar in shape to a maple leaf.

Flower

Trumpet-shaped white flowers about 3 inches wide and 3 inches deep grow on the top one-third of the plants from July to September giving way to seedpods that ripen from August to October.

The plant will begin to flower in the second year.

Harvest the leaves after flowering and harvest the root in late fall.

Marshmallow Althaea officinalis Edible Perennial

Marshmallow Althaea officinalis Edible Perennial

Propagation

Marshmallow can be propagated via seed, divisions, and cuttings.

Cold stratify seeds for 4 weeks and then plant just below the soil surface, and space the groups of seeds 18 to 24 inches apart. Root divisions are taken in late fall or early spring when there is not active growth above ground.  Softwood cuttings are easy to root in the summer.

Marshmallow Althaea officinalis Edible Perennial

Marshmallow Althaea officinalis Edible Perennial

Edible

The leaves, flowers, roots and seeds are edible. Roots contain a mucilagelike material that can be cooked into a soft sweet food and was used as the original marshmallow.

Marsh Mallow contains starch, mucilage, pectin, oil, sugar, asparagin, phosphate of lime, glutinous matter and cellulose. (2)

Medicinal

According to webmd.com; “Marshmallow leaf and root are used for pain and swelling (inflammation) of the mucous membranes that line the respiratory tract. They are also used for dry cough, inflammation of the lining of the stomach, diarrhea, stomach ulcers, constipation, urinary tract inflammation, and stones in the urinary tract.
People sometimes apply marshmallow leaf and root directly to the skin for pockets of infection (abscesses) and skin ulcers; and as a poultice for skin inflammation or burns, and for other wounds.” * (1)

* These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration.  This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

Amazon Link for Seeds

Recipe

Marsh Mallow Water
‘Soak one ounce of marshmallow roots in a little cold water for half an hour. Peel off the bark, or skin. Cut up the roots into small shavings, and put them into a jug to stand for a couple of hours; the decoction must be drunk tepid, and may be sweetened with honey or sugar-candy, and flavored with orange-flower water, or with orange juice. (2)

Photo References/Sources:

(1) http://www.webmd.com/vitamins-supplements/ingredientmono-774-marshmallow.aspx?activeingredientid=774&
(2) http://www.botanical.com/botanical/mgmh/m/mallow07.html
(3) Copyright expired due to age of image Source: from ”Koehler’s Medicinal-Plants” 1887 {{GFDL-DD}} (PIC1)
(4) flower Pic: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Althea_officinalis_flor.jpg
(5) {{Information |Description ={{en|1=Marshmallow roots from a cultivated ”Althaea officinalis” plant, Castelltallat, Catalonia}} |Source ={{own}} |Author =Victor M. Vicente Selvas |Date =04/12

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Herb Spiral with Michael Judd | Permaculture

Herb Spiral with Michael Judd | Permaculture

Today I have the pleasure of showing you Herb Spiral with Michael Judd and some of the work he has done with herb spirals and to explain what an herb spiral is.  Michael himself makes an appearance near the end of the video to give a tour of one of the herb spirals that he has built.


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About Michael

Herb Spiral with Michael Judd | Permaculture

Herb Spiral with Michael Judd | Permaculture

Michael Judd is the hugely successful author of Edible Landscaping with a Permaculture Twist.  He also runs Ecologiadesign.com where he does consulting and design work and can actually do an entire project from beginning to end, including installation.  Michael also does several workshops, talks, and tours throughout the year.  He has been featured on several podcasts including; The Urban Farm podcast, A Way to Garden podcast, The Real Dirt podcast, Sustainable World Radio podcast, Grow Edible podcast, and the Permaculture Podcast.

Herb Spiral with Michael Judd | Permaculture

Herb Spiral with Michael Judd | Permaculture

Permaculture

Michael not only teaches others about permaculture, but he lives the permaculture life.  I have been to his house a couple of times and he has permaculture all around.  He has an Hugelkultur mound, which is wood buried by dirt.  He has a food forest, bees, and even built and lives in a straw bale house.

Herb Spiral Basics

An herb spiral as explained by Michael Judd is like a snail shell coming out of the ground to create microclimates and provide lots of planting space in a small area.

Herb spirals are beautiful but also allow you to stack plants horizontally AND vertically to maximize space.

Herb Spiral with Michael Judd | Permaculture

Herb Spiral with Michael Judd | Permaculture

Microclimates

An herb spiral creates microclimates with regards to heat, moisture, sun and shade.  At the top of an herb spiral the soil is drier than the soil at the bottom of the herb spiral.  This is because the water seeps into the soil and naturally flows down because of gravity.

There are areas that get morning sun only, other areas that get late day sun only and some areas that get all day sun.  This variation allows you to put plants in specific areas of the spiral to meet their sun needs.  This also applies to heat and coolness because of the amount of sun they receive.

Herb Spiral with Michael Judd | Permaculture

Herb Spiral with Michael Judd | Permaculture

Extended Season

Herb spirals are generally made with large rocks or bricks.  These large blocks absorb sun during the day and help keep the plants warm, extending the growing season.

Michael Judd’s book, Edible Landscaping with a Permaculture Twist explains how to build an herb spiral.  You can purchase his book on Amazon.

The Video

Check out the video below titled Herb Spiral with Michael Judd

All photos and video courtesy of Michael Judd; used with permission

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Epi076 Great Escape Farms Podcast

Epi076 Great Escape Farms Podcast

This post covers Epi076 Great Escape Farms Podcast – The Week in Review, My Favorite Smoothie Recipe, Mortier Pilon Kombucha Brewing Jar Product Review, Shiitake Mushroom Growing Kit Product Review, Blue Vervain, and Edible Landscaping with a Permaculture Twist by Michael Judd.


Great Escape Farms is now on Patreon! If you enjoy our work and want to help support us, please check out our Patreon page at: https://www.patreon.com/gef


Great Escape Farms Podcast

Great Escape Farms Podcast

Great Escape Podcast is an audio version of the blog posts from Great Escape Farms, Specializing in Unique Edible Plants, Permaculture Gardens, and Homesteading. The blog posts can be viewed at GreatEscapeFarms.com.

If you would like to subscribe to this podcast on iTunes, you can do so by clicking on Great Escape Podcast.

Click on the icon below for other RSS feed options.
Great Escape Farms Podcast

Please help us by going to iTunes or whatever podcast feed you use and rate our program. We are a new small company and the ratings will help us become more popular on the podcast feeds.

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Any time you are going to buy something from Amazon, please go through our site. All you have to do is click the Amazon button on the menu bar at the top of every page on our web site. That link will take you to Amazon and you then shop as you normally do. It does NOT cost you one penny more! Thank you very much for helping to support our small business!

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Edible Landscaping with a Permaculture Twist by Michael Judd

Edible Landscaping with a Permaculture Twist by Michael Judd

Last month I had the fortune of interviewing Michael Judd, the author of Edible Landscaping with a Permaculture Twist.  This video is Michael explaining what his book is about.  There is a summary below.  There are also links below to Michael’s website, Facebook site, and an Amazon link to his book.


Great Escape Farms is now on Patreon! If you enjoy our work and want to help support us, please check out our Patreon page at: https://www.patreon.com/gef


Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/Edible-Landscaping-Permaculture-Twist-Have/dp/0615873790/ref=as_sl_pc_qf_sp_asin_til?tag=greescfar-20&linkCode=w00&linkId=d99a8d2ccb16461748017ec81d0147c7&creativeASIN=0615873790

Michael’s Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ediblelandpermtwist/?fref=ts

Michael’s Instagram: Permaculture Ninja

Micheal’s Website: http://www.ecologiadesign.com/

Edible Landscaping with a Permaculture Twist has eight chapters.  I outline each of the chapters below followed by my thoughts of the book as a whole.

Edible Landscaping with a Permaculture Twist by Michael Judd

Edible Landscaping with a Permaculture Twist by Michael Judd

Introduction

The introduction chapter explains what edible landscaping is and why you would want it.  This chapter also explains what permaculture is and how to give edible landscaping a permaculture twist.

Herb Spiral, The Ultimate Raised Bed

An herb spiral as explained by Michael is like a snail shell coming out of the ground to create microclimates and provide lots of planting space in a small area.  This chapter explains what an herb spiral is, how to construct one and why you would want to construct one.  He even gives some examples of what someone may want to put in an herb spiral.

Rainwater Harvesting, Swales & Rain Gardens

In this chapter Michael explains some of the ways to harvest and conserve water.  He focuses on swales, which are a ditch on contour, to slow and stop the water to allow it to penetrate the land.  Michael then explains how to make and calibrate an A-frame level, how to design and dig a swale, and some concepts for dealing with raised beds, such as mulching and planting into them.  He also talks about rain gardens for capturing water and how to construct one and explains how to make a good soil mixture to put into the rain garden.

Edible Landscaping with a Permaculture Twist by Michael Judd

Edible Landscaping with a Permaculture Twist by Michael Judd

Fungi!! Growing Specialty Mushrooms

The fungi chapter covers several different ways of cultivating fungi and harvesting the fruit – the mushrooms.  He covers a good deal of safety in this chapter, as you have to be careful and not eat any old mushroom.  One of the best ways to be safe with mushrooms is to grow your own and this chapter gives you several ways to do this and several sources to order material from.

Food Forests

To quote Michael; “A Food Forest is a low maintenance gardening technique that mimics a woodland ecosystem but substitutes woodland species with edible trees, bushes, perennial vegetables, herbs, vines, and annuals.”  In this chapter he also touches on sheet mulching, companion planting, and guilds.

Uncommon Fruits

Here you will find some of the great forgotten fruits of our area as well as some not from our area.  The list includes persimmon, paw paw, hardy kiwi, mulberry, jujube, goumi, sea berry, gooseberry & currants, and cider apples.  He teaches us how to prune various fruit trees at different stages of a trees life cycle, how to graft, and how and when to paint a tree.

Hugelkultur, Mounds of Fertility

Hugelkultur is a mound of wood with soil on top.  The first year or two are not great to grow in, but after that there is added fertility and hydration in the soil available to plants.  Some mounds are built on top of the soil and some are sunken in the ground.

Earthen Ovens

Earthen ovens are better insulated than brick ovens allow the heat to be used longer and more efficiently.  This chapter explains how to make one of these and gives very good detailed instructions along with a lot of pictures.  He even offers up a recipe for your first pizza!

My Thoughts

I met Michael at the Mid-Atlantic permaculture convergence in August where he was the key note speaker.  He was selling books there and I bought one.  I went on a business trip the next week and read this book cover to cover and immediately wanted to build an earthen oven, herb spiral, and get some mushroom logs going.

Edible Landscaping with a Permaculture Twist by Michael Judd

Edible Landscaping with a Permaculture Twist by Michael Judd

This book is probably not for the career permaculturist.  It is absolutely for someone who is just starting out in permaculture or any level of gardening.  He explains permaculture concepts and actually all concepts in a very easy to understand way and does not drown you with unfamiliar technology and terminology, but you do walk away having learned an immense amount of new information.

The Video

Check out the video below titled Edible Landscaping with a Permaculture Twist by Michael Judd.

Thanks for visiting the Edible Landscaping with a Permaculture Twist by Michael Judd!

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Blue Vervain | Swamp Verbena | Wild Hyssop

Blue Vervain | Swamp Verbena | Wild Hyssop

Blue Vervain is a beautiful perennial flower that is beneficial to good insects and can also be made into a tea.


Great Escape Farms is now on Patreon! If you enjoy our work and want to help support us, please check out our Patreon page at: https://www.patreon.com/gef


My Experience

I do not have a lot of experience growing this herb yet.  I was in a Permaculture Design Class (PDC) this past fall and one of the people there was an herbalist.  She had a number of packets of seeds for sale and blue vervain was one of them.  She explained to us what the seeds were and some of the benefits so I had to buy them.  Below I will explain a little about this plant and will follow up later this year on how they did.

The Basics

The botanical name is Verbena hastate.  It is also known as swamp verbena, wild hyssop, wild vervain, and herb of grace.  Blue vervain is native to the United States and is a perennial wildflower that grows from 2 to 5 feet tall.  It is a self-seeding herbaceous perennial that is hardy to -40 degrees F making it hardy in USDA hardiness zones: 3 to 8.

Vervain has square green to reddish stems with opposite leaves that are up to 6″ long and 1″ across.  It prefers moist conditions and full to partial sun.

Blue Vervain | Swamp Verbena | Wild Hyssop

Blue Vervain | Swamp Verbena | Wild Hyssop (3)

Flower

This insect beneficial plant has purplish-blue flowers in mid to late summer, lasting about 1–1½ months. Each bloom is about 1/4 inch across and conspicuously lobed with no noticeable floral scent.

Propagation

Verbena hastate can be propagated via seeds, rhizome spread, and cuttings.

Cold stratify for 90 days.  Seeds need light to germinate, so press seeds into the surface soil and do not cover.

Propagation can be done via digging up suckers from rhizomes that spread out.

Propagate via cutting using 3 to 4 inch cutting.

Edible

Most sources online say to use the above ground parts, but there are a few sites that talk about using the rhizomes as well.  The above-ground parts of the plant should be gathered before flowering and dried. Vervain must be picked before flowering and dried promptly to be effective

Traditionally used as a tea, but also as a tincture, syrup, foot soak or bath herb, salve or cream.

The seed are edible when roasted and are ground into a powder and used an Indian flour.

Medicinal

According to Organic Facts dot net, blue vervain has a number of health benefits.  They say that it can help to eliminate toxins from the system, can help relieve respiratory irritation, and nervous disorders, chronic anxiety, stress, and sleeplessness.  They go on to talk about the anti-parasitic activity, female tonic, oral health and pain relief. (1) *

According to the USDA website, blue vervain is used internally to treat depression, fevers, coughs, cramps, jaundice, and headaches. Externally, it is used for acne, ulcers, and cuts. (2) *

Check out the link in the sources section for details.

* These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration.  This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

Recipe

A vervain tea can be made by steeping 1 tablespoon dried Blue Vervain leaves, roots and flower in 2 cups of hot water for 8 to 10 minutes.

Amazon Link

Herb                       Seeds

 

Photo References/Sources:

(1) https://www.organicfacts.net/health-benefits/herbs-and-spices/blue-vervain.html

(2) https://plants.usda.gov/factsheet/pdf/fs_veha2.pdf

(3) Picture: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/User:Fritzflohrreynolds

Thanks for visiting the Blue Vervain | Swamp Verbena | Wild Hyssop page!

 

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Epi075 Great Escape Farms Podcast

Epi075 Great Escape Farms Podcast

This post covers Epi075 Great Escape Farms Podcast – Moving to every other week podcast and newsletter, Geoff Lawton PDC, Interview with Michael Judd, and Great Escape Nursery Discount code.


Great Escape Farms is now on Patreon! If you enjoy our work and want to help support us, please check out our Patreon page at: https://www.patreon.com/gef


Great Escape Farms Podcast - Geoff Lawton PDC

Great Escape Farms Podcast

This episode is not going to be the usual weekly episode.  Today’s podcast will be a short one as I just have a few items to pass along to you.  First and foremost, the weekly podcast updates are going to change to bi-weekly or every other week.  This is being done because I need the time this spring to focus on the core business, which is the nursery business.

Going forward I will post four to six blog posts in a two-week period.  The blog posts will be the outlines for the podcasts, as they have been for the last year and a half.  We still plan on posting three to five videos on YouTube and will attempt to be as active as possible on the Facebook group “Homesteading and Permaculture”.  Our newsletter will also switch to every other week and will come out on the days that the podcast is posted.

A few other random notes I want to pass on – Two weeks ago I did a video interview with Michael Judd, who is the author of “Edible Landscaping with a Permaculture Twist”.  I plan to edit those videos and post them on the YouTube channel in the coming weeks.  We have hopes that the audio can be used as a standalone podcast as well.  If it does work out that way, I should be posting that interview in mid-February.

I’ll be starting my vegetables indoors in the next week or so.  With that project, will come several posts.  The posts include how I start plants indoors, do a product review on my indoor grow lights and give a review on how to stratify and scarify seeds.

This past weekend the contractors completed putting a roof on the mobile next to the farm.  The property and mobile home will likely be the business headquarters starting next year.  Now that the roof is on, I can start gutting the inside and rebuilding it.

Other projects this spring include finishing the sheet mulch project in the garden area at the farm, extending the food forest by another 75 feet, and planning out several swale runs across the fields out at the farm.  I’m also working on two consulting gigs in the local area.  Each may be an opportunity for people local to the Maryland area to assist with if they want a little hands on experience.  More to come on that in the near future.

Another thing gnawing at my time is preparing for the summer move from suburbia to the farm.  We are slowly moving stuff to the farm and getting rid of excess while trying to fix the place fixed up to put on the market.  Once we are living at the farm, things should be a little easier.

One other item I’m working on this spring is taking another PDC.  I have two PDCs under my belt, but had the chance to take the online Geoff Lawton PDC for a special discount, so I felt like I had to sign up.  I wouldn’t have added this extra work load at all if it wasn’t for Geoff teaching it.  I’m three weeks in and so far, it is awesome.  I’ll do a review of the different PDCs I’ve taken of the past few years after I complete this one.

If you haven’t had a chance to check out the nursery yet, head on over to GreatEscapeNursery.com and see what we are selling this year. I’ll be updating and adding items in a week or so.  And don’t forget to use the discount code “Get10” to get a discount code for 10% off your entire purchase.  This discount code is only good until January 31st 2017.

Our next regular podcast will be January 23, 2017 and will highlight the posts and videos from the last two weeks.  After that, the podcast will be every two weeks from then on.

That’s it for this week.  Please visit our blog at GreatEscapeFarms.com

Thank you for your time and I hope you enjoyed the show.

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Great Escape Farms Podcast

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Any time you are going to buy something from Amazon, please go through our site. All you have to do is click the Amazon button on the menu bar at the top of every page on our web site. That link will take you to Amazon and you then shop as you normally do. It does NOT cost you one penny more! Thank you very much for helping to support our small business!

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Shiitake Mushroom Growing Kit Product Review

Shiitake Mushroom Growing Kit Product Review

This is a Shiitake Mushroom Growing Kit Product Review.  The kit is intended to be grown in the house to get organic fresh Shiitake mushrooms.


Great Escape Farms is now on Patreon! If you enjoy our work and want to help support us, please check out our Patreon page at: https://www.patreon.com/gef


The Kit

The kit includes spore infused grow medium, humidity tent & instructions.  The grow medium is actually a substrate of mycelium infused woodchips and sawdust made from hardwoods.

Shiitake Mushroom Growing Kit Product Review

Shiitake Mushroom Growing Kit Product Review

I Bought my kit from Amazon – Cost $32 + shipping – ended up costing $40 – kit made by Fungi Perfecti at fungi.com – can buy directly from them.

The mushrooms are organic and produces up to 3 lbs of mushrooms.

About Shiitake

Botanical name of Shiitake is Lentinula edodes and is native to East Asia.  Shiitake mushrooms have a rich texture and smoky flavor and can be harvested at 2 week intervals for up to 16 weeks.

Back to the Kit

The first step with your mushroom kit is to look at the date on the front of the package and make sure it is over 40 days old.  If not, wait until it is at least 40 days old.

Then put it in the refrigerator for three to five days.

Soak

After refrigeration, you soak the mushroom medium in water for two to four hours.  Then move remove it from the water and put it on a plate and put the supplied humidity tent over it.

Shiitake Mushroom Growing Kit Product Review

Shiitake Mushroom Growing Kit Product Review

Spray

Spray the inside of the humidity tent with a mist of water for two to four times a day.

Shiitake Mushroom Growing Kit Product Review

Shiitake Mushroom Growing Kit Product Review

Harvest

Shiitake Mushroom Growing Kit Product Review

Shiitake Mushroom Growing Kit Product Review

In a couple of weeks, you will be harvesting your shiitake mushrooms!

Shiitake Mushroom Growing Kit Product Review

Shiitake Mushroom Growing Kit Product Review

Thoughts

I think this kit is great for someone who wants to see if they can grow shiitakes.  I do plan on growing them outside and this was an experiment just to see how difficult they are go grow.

Well, they are easy to grow and this was an awesome kit to find that out with.  I highly recommend this kit to someone who is looking to experiment with shiitakes.

?Want to Help our Small Business Out?

If you shop at Amazon, please go through our site.  All you have to do is click the Amazon button on the menu bar at the top of every page on our web site.  That link will take you to Amazon and you then shop as you normally do.  It does NOT cost you one penny more, but it does help us out!  Thank you very much for helping to support our small business!

The Video

Please check out the video below titled Shiitake Mushroom Growing Kit Product Review.

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Mortier Pilon Kombucha Brewing Jar Product Review

Mortier Pilon Kombucha Brewing Jar Product Review

This post is a Mortier Pilon Kombucha Brewing Jar Product Review.  This jar is designed to do continuous brew of kombucha.


Great Escape Farms is now on Patreon! If you enjoy our work and want to help support us, please check out our Patreon page at: https://www.patreon.com/gef


My Jar

Mortier Pilon Kombucha Brewing Jar Product Review

Mortier Pilon Kombucha Brewing Jar Product Review

I received a Mortier Pilon Kombucha Brewing Jar for my birthday this past week and figured I’d do a product review on it.  This jar is designed to do continuous brew of kombucha.  I have done posts on the past on Kombucha and how to make it.  It is merely fermented sweet tea.

The Kit

The kit assumes that you already know how to make kombucha.  It does give a high-level overview of the process, but really doesn’t go into a lot of details.  This kit comes with a 5-liter jar, a grease pencil for marking the date, and directions that include a few recipes.  The 5-liter jar has a special lid that allows the kombucha to breathe, but keeps fruit flies out of your brew.

Mortier Pilon Kombucha Brewing Jar Product Review

Mortier Pilon Kombucha Brewing Jar Product Review

Grease Pencil

The grease pencil is intended to write the date on the rim of the jar so you know when you started the brew.  I found it difficult to write on this space and broke the grease pencil.  I was able to scribble a date on there, but it is barely legible.  I’ll probably continue to write down my dates on paper as I have been doing for the last few months.

The Brew

I brewed up several batches of kombucha.  I did some the way that I have been doing it in half gallon jars and I did a batch in the Mortier Pilon continuous brew system. After 10 days, I tasted kombucha from both systems and they tasted the same.

Mortier Pilon Kombucha Brewing Jar Product Review

Mortier Pilon Kombucha Brewing Jar Product Review

Continuous Brew

The Mortier Pilon jar allows for continuous brew by allowing me to empty 2/3 of the brew out and then adding 2/3 sweet tea back into the continuous brew system.  The Mortier Pilon jar allows me to cut a few corners, but I only end up saving about two minutes per brew when used per their directions.

Modified Directions

The way I would probably do continuous brew would be to take about 1/3 to ½ of the brew out every three to five days or so.  Then I could have a continuous supply of brew at the rate I’m drinking it.  This would make much more sense to me.

Mortier Pilon Kombucha Brewing Jar Product Review

Mortier Pilon Kombucha Brewing Jar Product Review

Product Thoughts

The Mortier Pilon Kombucha Brewing Jar Product is pretty and I can understand someone wanting to use this if they are going to be brewing out in the open.  Personally, it is a bit expensive, selling for $60 on Amazon.  Brewing in the ½ gallon jars works fine for me because they are hidden off in the basement.

The continuous brew is a neat concept if you are not doing a second ferment like I do.  I like the carbonation and flavor and it is just easier for me to do a case at a time instead of every couple of days.

But that is me.  There are others out there that add kombucha to smoothies or drink it right from the first ferment.  If that is you, this is a great product that looks nice and is functional (except for the grease pencil).

Go or No Go

I’d have to say it depends on your situation, as described above.  If I was drinking from a first ferment on a daily basis, I would absolutely buy this product again.

Amazon Link

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The Video

Check out the video below titled Mortier Pilon Kombucha Brewing Jar Product Review.

Thanks for viewing the Mortier Pilon Kombucha Brewing Jar Product Review post.

Please give us your thoughts on Mortier Pilon Kombucha Brewing Jar Product Review by commenting below.

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My Favorite Smoothie Recipe

My Favorite Smoothie Recipe

This post gives you My Favorite Smoothie Recipe and shows some neat tricks and tips on quickly making smoothies.


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A smoothie is very customizable with the ingredients you can put in them.  I generally use a similar recipe, so to speed things up, I set up for mass producing.  This is done by flash freezing some of the ingredients.

My Favorite Smoothie Recipe

My Favorite Smoothie Recipe

Flash Freezing

I have flash frozen bananas and put them in a bag.  That way all I have to do is to pull out a handful or a cup full and add them to the blender.  I did a previous video and blog post on how to do this, so check the archives for more information on flash freezing fruit.

Freezing Leafy Greens

My Favorite Smoothie Recipe

My Favorite Smoothie Recipe

I also flash freeze leafy greens like spinach and kale.  I buy big bags of these leafy greens, blend them and add a little water until they are a liquid.  Then I pour them into ice cube trays and freeze them overnight.  After they are frozen solid, I remove them from the trays, put them in a 1-gallon plastic bag, label it, and keep them in the freezer.  Then when I’m making a smoothie, all I have to do is remove a few green ice cubes from the freezer and add them to the blender.

Go Organic

My Favorite Smoothie Recipe

My Favorite Smoothie Recipe

I try to go organic whenever I can.  Most fruit gets a lot of pesticides put on it and they can’t use those harsh chemicals on organic foods.

My Favorite Smoothie Recipe

My Favorite Smoothie Recipe

Freeze Your Own

Even better than organic is to freeze your own fruit.  Most fruit in any given variety seems to all ripen at the same time.  If you freeze the excess, you could use it for your smoothies all year long.

The Recipe

Mix the below ingredients together and blend to a consistency that you like.

My Favorite Smoothie Recipe

My Favorite Smoothie Recipe

Ingredients

1C – Frozen Sliced Bananas

2 – Spinach Ice Cubes

2 – Kale Ice Cubes

1 ½ C – Frozen Organic Cherries (from BJs)

2C – Frozen Organic Triple Berry (From BJs) (Strawberry, Blackberry, & Raspberry)

1TBSP – Local Raw Honey

1 Scoop – Raw Organic Protein (Garden of Life brand)

1 Avocado (optional)

3C – Filtered Water

My Favorite Smoothie Recipe

My Favorite Smoothie Recipe

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The Video

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Epi074 Great Escape Farms Podcast

Epi074 Great Escape Farms Podcast

This post covers Epi074 Great Escape Farms Podcast – The Week in Review, Propagating Rose of Sharon, Eating Canna Lily Rhizome, and How To Make Elderberry Syrup.


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Great Escape Farms Podcast

Great Escape Farms Podcast

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