Viking Aronia Plants for Sale at Great Escape Nursery

Viking Aronia Plants for Sale at Great Escape Nursery

The Viking Aronia plant is a unique edible plant that is high in antioxidants. Rooted Viking Aronia Plants for Sale at Great Escape Nursery.

Viking Aronia Plants for Sale

Price $9.95 –

Viking Aronia Plants for Sale at Great Escape Nursery

Viking Aronia Plants for Sale at Great Escape Nursery

Viking Aronia Plant Information

When it comes to unusual things to grow in your garden Aronia ranks right up there with the best of them. Aronia (aronia melanocarpa) is a member of the rose family and is a deciduous cold hardy shrub. It bears fruit that is very astringent… so much so that it is also called chokeberry because the astringency makes you want to choke.

This attractive ornamental is a very showy plant with leaves that come out bright green in the spring.  They turn darker green as summer goes on and then turns bright red in autumn. In mid to late May it has fragrant flowers with five petals that give way to clumps of small astringent fruit as the summer passes.

I have had great success with the Viking Aronia. In the second year of growing, it produced about two cups of berries. In the third year of growing it produced a gallon zip lock bag full. I enjoy the fruit fresh out of hand from the Viking. This year I set aside a gallon bag full of the fruit and froze it.

Plant Specifications

This plant is hardy from zones 3 to 8, it prefers moist acidic well drained soil and full sun. It is a multi-stemmed shrub that reaches a height and width of 6-foot. It has leaves that are alternate on the branches. They are 1 to 3 inches long and just under 1 inch up to 2 inches wide.

Viking Aronia (Aronia Melanocarpa)

The fruit matures in August and is small black and glossy and has up to 5 small seeds inside. Aronia is native to eastern North America.

Viking Aronia

Viking Aronia

A picture of one of our rooted Viking Aronia is displayed above.  Please note that this plant was picked at random and the other plants may have roots smaller or larger than this plant.

More information including an Aronia berry recipe please visit Aronia Plant Care | Unusual Things to Grow in Your Garden.

Be sure to check out our other great plants for sale at Great Escape Nursery.

Thank you for visiting, we look forward to answering any questions

MAP

MAP

Notes will be posted here from Todd’s plant propagation workshop that he is teaching at the Mid-Atlantic permaculture conference.

Harvesting Honeyberry Haskap Lonicera caerulea

Harvesting Honeyberry Haskap Lonicera caerulea

Harvesting Honeyberry Haskap Lonicera caerulea provides you with an overview of honeyberry, followed by how to harvest and when and some of the uses of the wonderful edible honeysuckle.


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I have four honeyberry plants in my suburban landscape. My plants are still small, but they have been producing for the last couple of years.  This is one of my favorite plants in the yard, primarily because it is the first plant in the spring to provide fruit.  To me, it signals the start of another growing and harvest season.

Harvesting Honeyberry Haskap Lonicera caerulea - Plant

Harvesting Honeyberry Haskap Lonicera caerulea – Plant

Honeyberry Background

Honeyberry plants, with a Latin name of Lonicera caerulea, are a deciduous shrub that is a member of the honeysuckle family and is also called blue honeysuckle, and haskap. They are extremely cold hardy, bears fruit, and is very long lived with a 50+ year lifespan.

How to Grow Them

The very hardy plant has some varieties that are hardy down to USDA zone 2. Honeyberries grow best in moist, well-drained soil. They may perform better in clay soils than sandy soils and do benefit from a good layer of organic mulch. The ideal pH is 6.5, but they are adapted to a pH range of 5 to 8.  It grows in sunny or shady locations. The shrub will grow from 3 to 8 feet tall, with oblong berries ½ – 1 inch or more in length and alternate leaves.

Blooming

These are some of the earliest blooming plants in my garden.  My plants bloomed in February this year, but usually the bloom in early March.  Everything has bloomed early this year due to a warm winter and warm spring.

Fruiting depends on availability of pollinators when plants are blooming. They require proximity to another unrelated honeyberry plant for pollination by bees and other insects. Most honeyberries, like apples, need a different honeyberry plant for pollination. Both plants must bloom at the same time.

Harvesting Honeyberry Haskap Lonicera caerulea - Bloom

Harvesting Honeyberry Haskap Lonicera caerulea – Bloom

Harvesting

Honeyberries produce fruit on year-old wood. To find the fruit look underneath the branches close to the older stem. Some varieties produce 10+ lbs of berries after 5 years, others produce 1-2 lbs. They bear best in sun in the North, and needs some protection from sun in the South.

Make sure berries are a dark blue color all the way through before picking for the sweetest taste.  When they are ready to pick, just give them a slight tug and they should come right off the plant.

Edible Fruit

It is said to taste like raspberry, blueberry, kiwi, cherry, or grapes, depending upon the taster. The sweet, unique flavor that is good for fresh eating or making preserves, pastries, juice, wine, jams, ice cream, yogurt, candies, and sauces.

Harvesting Honeyberry Haskap Lonicera caerulea - Fruit

Harvesting Honeyberry Haskap Lonicera caerulea – Fruit


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The Video

Check out the video below titled Harvesting Honeyberry Haskap Lonicera caerulea

Harvesting Honeyberry Haskap Lonicera caerulea YouTube

Harvesting Honeyberry Haskap Lonicera caerulea YouTube

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Bullhead Catfish in the Farm Pond

Bullhead Catfish in the Farm Pond

This post and video show the Bullhead Catfish in the Farm Pond as well as the blue gill.

This weekend I went out to the pond at the farm and fed the catfish.  I have been feeding them off and on since I bought the farm in 2012.  We believe the person who lived there before me stocked the pond with catfish, sunny or blue gill and a few bass.  I have not seen any of the bass in a few years now, so I think they have all perished.

Bullhead Catfish in the Farm Pond

Bullhead Catfish in the Farm Pond

I’m not an expert on catfish, but in looking around at some of the various sites, I believe they are bullhead catfish.  Ameiurus is a genus of catfish that contains the brown, black, and yellow bullhead catfish.  The fish in my pond have the square tail, which is one of the distinguishing factors of the bullhead catfish.

We sometimes do catch and release fishing with the catfish.  I’d recommend checking out bullhead fishing for a good bit more information about this variety of catfish and how to catch them.

Bullhead Catfish in the Farm Pond

Bullhead feeding Time

The bullhead fishing site gets into some of the jigs that can be used to catch the catfish as well as how to filet them.  This site has quite a bit of useful information and I’d recommend you check it out.

Bullhead Catfish in the Farm Pond

Catfish in the Farm Pond

Below is a video showing my catfish swarming and eating the food we are tossing in.  They are munching on this right next to the blue gill.  The blue gills are a little cautious so as to not be catfish entrée, but they are right in there eating with the catfish.

The Video

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Harvesting Jerusalem Artichoke Sunchoke

Harvesting Jerusalem Artichoke Sunchoke

This Harvesting Jerusalem Artichoke Sunchoke post explains how to harvest this interesting tuberous plant and how to store and prepare the tubers.


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From One Tuber

Harvesting Jerusalem Artichoke Sunchoke - 100s

Harvesting Jerusalem Artichoke Sunchoke – 100s

Last year I put in one tuber of Jerusalem artichoke.  This year I have hundreds.  They spread like mad, so make sure you don’t put them in an area that they can take over and kill out or smother other plants.

The tubers look like the tubers on canna or ginger root, but are a little smaller.  While harvesting Jerusalem artichoke sunchoke, if you miss even one small piece, it will grow into many more plants.

Harvesting Jerusalem Artichoke Sunchoke - Tuber

Harvesting Jerusalem Artichoke Sunchoke – Tuber

Inulin

The tubers have a lot of inulin in them, so they are mildly sweet but will not spike your blood sugar like a lot of other sweet or starchy foods.  Be warned though, inulin does not set well with some people and can ferment in the stomach causing gas, sometimes severe.

How do you Eat Them?

Jerusalem artichoke can be eaten raw or cooked.  They are generally sliced thin with the skin still on and put on salads.  One way I heard to try them was to use a cheese grader and then sprinkle them on a salad.  I’ll have to try that.

They can be boiled and used as a potato substitute, but boiling makes them a little mushy.  If you steam them, they have a little better consistency.

The Plant

The plant itself is in the sunflower family and has small yellow flowers that are a little larger than a quarter dollar.  They will grow to ten feet tall, as we already mentioned, they have a spreading habit and can become invasive.  They like fertile soil and full sun.

To Harvest

In order to harvest them, just dig down and start pulling them up.  They will grow just below the surface, down to as much as a foot or more in depth.  I put mine in in a gallon ziplock bag.  They store ok in the refrigerator for a week or so.  If they sit too long, they start breaking down into a starch and lose the crispness.

For longer term storage, they can be frozen, but the best long term storage is just to leave them in the ground.

Harvesting Jerusalem Artichoke Sunchoke - Gallon Bag

Harvesting Jerusalem Artichoke Sunchoke – Gallon Bag

When to Harvest

The best time to go about harvesting Jerusalem artichoke sunchoke is after a few frosts.  They can be left in the ground over the winter and harvested all the way up to mid-Spring.  After mid-Spring, they start using the stored energy in the tubers and the tuber quality goes down.  Eventually, the tuber will be spent and become almost hollow.  When this happens, it is a good time to pull out the excess plants, because there will not be enough energy left in the tubers to grow new plants.  This is one effective way to control the spread of these plants.

Harvesting Jerusalem Artichoke Sunchoke - Spent Tuber

Harvesting Jerusalem Artichoke Sunchoke – Spent Tuber


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The Video

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Harvesting Jerusalem Artichoke Sunchoke - Video

Harvesting Jerusalem Artichoke Sunchoke – Video

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Blackberry Primocane Blackberry Floricane

Blackberry Primocane Blackberry Floricane

This Blackberry Primocane Blackberry Floricane post explains and shows the difference between the two canes on this perennial plant with biennial canes.


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Blackberry Primocane

The blackberry primocanes are the first-year canes.  With traditional blackberries, they are the canes that grow very long and do not fruit the first year.  Primocanes do not grow any longer after the first year of growth. The primocanes on the variety that I own grow to about two twenty-feet long the first year.  The variety that I have does not fruit on the primocanes.

There are varieties on the market that do fruit on primocanes.  They will generally fruit on these canes closer to the fall.  These variety of blackberries are referred to as “primocanes”.  They fruit in the spring on the floricanes, go a month or so without fruiting, and then fruit again that same year on the primocanes.

Blackberry Primocane Blackberry Floricane

Blackberry Primocane Blackberry Floricane

Blackberry Floricane

The blackberry floricanes are the lateral growth that grows on last year’s primocanes.  The floricanes generally only grow about three to twelve inches long in the spring and quickly get buds on them in the spring that will provide you with the spring fruit.

Blackberry Primocane Blackberry Floricane2

Blackberry Primocane Blackberry Floricane2

Spent Canes

Spent canes are the blackberry canes that are three years old.  Generally, they will not even leaf out the third year and will turn a brownish grey color with the bark starting to peel.  These canes are done and should be cut out to make room for more primocanes.

Perennial vs Biennial

Blackberries have perennial roots.  They will survive the winters and come back year after year.  The canes are considered biennial, in that they only live two years, first primocane, then floricane, and then they are done.


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The Video

Check out the video below titled Blackberry Primocane Blackberry Floricane.

Blackberry Primocane Blackberry Floricane

Blackberry Primocane Blackberry Floricane

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Food Forest Weeding or Forest Garden Weeding

Food Forest Weeding or Forest Garden Weeding

Food Forest Weeding or Forest Garden Weeding is about advantaging wanted plants and disadvantaging weeds in the first two years of a food forest.


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Background

I put in a food forest, also known as a forest garden two years ago.  Because the plants are very expensive, I bought them small to save money or propagated them myself.  With the plants being very small, they can easily get buried in the weeds.

Food Forest Weeding - Weeds

Food Forest Weeding – Weeds

Weeding

The food forest will get weeded a couple of times and each time it is done, the plants I put in will become advantaged and the weeds will become disadvantaged.  The first thing I did this time was to cut the unwanted weeds and grasses down as close to the ground as I could get them.

Cardboard

Food Forest Weeding - Cardboard

Food Forest Weeding – Cardboard

Next, we wet some cardboard.  The cardboard should be free of any tape or staples.  Then use a hose to wet the inside and all sides of the outside of the cardboard.  Wetting the cardboard will prevent it from becoming hydrophobic and causing a problem later.  It will also allow the cardboard to conform to the shape of the ground more and make it better for the worms.  Worms just love wet cardboard, so about the time that the weeds have died off, the worms will be pushing through.  This will allow water to get through that layer and access the soil.

Leaves

Plants and soil microbes both love to be covered with mulch and there is no better mulch than leaves.  I have put leaves down several times in this area before, but the wind always blows them away.  This time I put down a heavy layer of leaves on top of the cardboard and wet them down.  Then I covered the leaves with wood chips.

Food Forest Weeding - Mulch

Food Forest Weeding – Mulch

Wood Chips

The wood chips I received were delivered for free!  That’s right.  Free.  I found a tree trimming company that was trimming trees around the power lines and they delivered the mulch to my house.  Otherwise, they have to pay to drop them off at a landfill or recycling center.

Not All at Once

I will not do the entire food forest all at once.  We will spend an hour or so at a time and just do the worse sections.  Eventually the whole thing will get done, but we are not going to stress over it.  In a few years, we will just do chop and drop and not use any external inputs.


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The Video

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Food Forest Weeding - Video

Food Forest Weeding – Video

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Large Rainwater Harvesting System Upgrade

Large Rainwater Harvesting System Upgrade

Large Rainwater Harvesting System Upgrade is about my 1200 gallon to 4500 Rainwater Harvesting System Upgrade.  I’m in the process of moving from four 300-gallon IBC totes to three 1550-gallon water storage tanks.

Large Rainwater Harvesting System Upgrade

Large Rainwater Harvesting System Upgrade


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Remove the IBC Totes

The first step was to remove the four 300-gallon IBC totes, the wood, and the cinder blocks that they were setting on.  I stored all of this equipment for later use, either to be added to this system as expansion or to be used at the mobile home, which will be Great Escape Farms headquarters.

Level

Large Rainwater Harvesting System Upgrade - Tanks in Place

Large Rainwater Harvesting System Upgrade – Tanks in Place

Next was the task of leveling.  I’m trying to keep the budget as cheap as possible and for that reason I used wood chips.  I know that they will break down and this is not the best choice in all the world, but it is the cheapest because I have 40-yards of mulch laying around.  As long as it gets me through the summer and into the fall, then I’m happy.  I can add more next spring to build things up and level out again.  Then I put the tanks in place.

Plumbing the Bottom

Large Rainwater Harvesting System Upgrade - Bottom Plumbing

Large Rainwater Harvesting System Upgrade – Bottom Plumbing

I did not have time to do all the plumbing in the bottom portion of the system.  But we have some large storms coming this week and I want to catch water, so I will do enough plumbing so the tanks will hold water.  What I did is put in 2” threaded PVC to a regular PVC fitting.  Then I attached a quick disconnect followed by a ball valve.   I shut the ball valve off to hold the water in.

Plumbing the Top

Large Rainwater Harvesting System Upgrade - Upper Plumbing

Large Rainwater Harvesting System Upgrade – Upper Plumbing

All of the filtering system is still in place from last year’s system.  I will cover more on that in a future video.  We did need to slightly modify the top system after the filter system so that it aimed into the new larger water storage tanks.  I did not glue anything so I could fine tune everything later.


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The Video

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Large Rainwater Harvesting System Upgrade - Video

Large Rainwater Harvesting System Upgrade – Video

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Unusual Edible Plants to Grow in Full Bloom at the Homestead

Unusual Edible Plants to Grow in Full Bloom at the Homestead

This video shows our Unusual Edible Plants to Grow in Full Bloom.  We take a walk through the urban homestead and look at all of the unusual edible plants that are integrated into the landscape that are currently blooming.


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Here’s What I’m Doing

I have walked around the Pasadena MD homestead with a video camera several times in the past, but today I’m doing it and highlighting the plants that are in full bloom.  The reason I’m doing this is that many people eat the fruits, but have no idea what the plants or blooms look like.

Some Fruiting Bushes

The plants shown in the video below include blueberries, Sweet Scarlet Goumi, gooseberry, and nanking cherry.  The nanking cherry was in full bloom when we had an ice storm a few weeks ago, but there are several little fruits that did make it.

Unusual Edible Plants to Grow in Full Bloom - Goumi

Unusual Edible Plants to Grow in Full Bloom – Goumi

The Pear Tree

I have a multi-variety pear tree that has several blooms on the different limbs.  The multi-variety is done so they flower at the same time and can cross pollinate with just one tree.

The Peach Tree

The peach trees and nectarine trees had quite a few buds on them when the ice storm hit, but some of the fruit seems to have made it.

The Dogwoods

I have a cornelian cherry that is flowering for this first time.  The Kousa dogwood is not flowering yet.  The honeyberry bushes are about the first plants to flower out and ice and snow do not seem to bother it in the least.

Unusual Edible Plants to Grow in Full Bloom - Honey Berry

Unusual Edible Plants to Grow in Full Bloom – Honey Berry

Sour Cherry

The sour cherry tree is loaded with blooms.  I have two apple trees that have never bloomed out before, but they are both flowering out this year.

Figs

I have two figs that are just starting to bud out right now.  Usually the figs die back to the ground, but this year they are budding out right from where they finished last year.

Bush Cherry

I have a Korean bush cherry that still has some flowers on it, but I don’t know if it is going to produce fruit or not.  The information I have found on this plant states that it is somewhat self-fertile, but so far, I have found that to not be the case.  I’ll keep an eye on it and see, but I think I may need to get another one to cross pollinate.

Nitrogen Fixing

I have a couple of autumn olive plants right next to some of my fruit trees.  They were put there to act as nitrogen fixers for the fruit trees.  You have to trim the plants to get them to release nitrogen into the ground for the fruit trees.  You have to be careful with these plants as they can be invasive when the birds eat the seeds and deposit them in surrounding areas.

Just in front of the autumn olive is a quince that has a half dozen blooms.

Unusual Edible Plants to Grow in Full Bloom - Quince

Unusual Edible Plants to Grow in Full Bloom – Quince

Not Blooming Yet

We also take a look at some comfrey, rosa Ragusa, raspberry, and red currant plant.  Then we wander by some figs, elderberries, and sea berries. None of these plants are flowering out yet.

Aronia

The last plant that we look at is the Viking Aronia, which has hundreds of blooms.  It is a very attractive plant and has survived well with me constantly taking cuttings for propagations.

Lovely Time of Year

This is a beautiful time of year and it looks like it is going to be a bountiful year.


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The Video

Check out the video below titled Unusual Edible Plants to Grow in Full Bloom

Unusual Edible Plants to Grow in Full Bloom - The Video

Unusual Edible Plants to Grow in Full Bloom – The Video

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Epi082 Great Escape Farms Podcast – Food Forest Garden Update, Companion Planting and Fruit Tree Fair Workshop Notes

Epi082 Great Escape Farms Podcast – Food Forest Garden Update, Companion Planting and Fruit Tree Fair Workshop Notes

This post covers Epi082 Great Escape Farms Podcast – Food Forest Garden Update, Companion Planting and Fruit Tree Fair Workshop Notes, Sustainable Homesteading in WV, Pruning Muscadine Grape Vines, and The Week in Review.


Great Escape Farms is now on Patreon! If you enjoy our work and want to help support us, please check out our Patreon page at: https://www.patreon.com/gef You can support us for as little as $1.


Great Escape Farms Podcast

Great Escape Farms Podcast

Great Escape Podcast is an audio version of the blog posts from Great Escape Farms, Specializing in Unique Edible Plants, Permaculture Gardens, and Homesteading. The blog posts can be viewed at GreatEscapeFarms.com.

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Great Escape Farms Podcast

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