Today I took a Spring walk around the homestead and videoed the walk to compare and contrast two previous videos I took, one in the late summer and one in the winter.

A Spring Walk Around the Homestead

A Spring Walk Around the Homestead

Even though it is officially spring, it still seems to early for everything to be flowering out now.  My apricot, peach, nectarine, plum, and nanking cherries have all flowered already.  My Korean cherry and cherry trees are just about to flower.  For some reason I don’t recall all of these plants flowering in March.  I thought it was mid-April before they flowered out.  Anyhow, I’m not complaining as I love it when the plants are budding out and flowering.

I have included a YouTube video near the bottom of this post that shows what I saw on my walk.  You can also see my late summer and winter videos at the Great Escape Farms YouTube channel.

Another fun thing about spring is new plants.  I have received quite a few new plants and seeds in the past couple of weeks.  I received a half a dozen new varieties of honey berry, a couple of different types of mulberry, and a couple of different types of raspberry that I do not have. One of the raspberries is a gold color. I also received 5 different types of seedless grapes.

I have been branching out lately and trying some edible perennial plants as well.  I just received a shipment in from a place called Food Forest Farm (foodforestfarm.com) that specializes in permaculture perennial plants.  Some of the plants you have probably heard of before like welsh onion, wild leek, perennial leek and sunchoke or artichoke.  But I found others that I have not even heard of before like Turkish Rocket, which is a perennial that has flower heads like broccoli and has a nutty and mustardy flavor.

Another one I found is called Mint Root that has tubers that you can harvest in the fall or early spring.  The tubers are kind of like water chestnut.  Then there is Korean Celery which has leaves and stalks that taste like celery.  So whats the big deal, why not just grow celery?  Because Korean Celery is perennial and comes back year after year.

I also bought Ground Bean, Perpetual Sorrel, and Sweet Cicely.  I will eventually do a post on each of these perennial plants giving you a full bio to include how they taste (at least on my pallet).

Please give us your thoughts about A Spring Walk Around the Homestead by commenting below.

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