Epi017 – Great Escape Podcast Week of 12/28/15

Epi017 – Great Escape Podcast Week of 12/28/15

Great Escape Podcast

Great Escape Podcast

Great Escape Podcast is an audio version of the blog posts from Great Escape Farms, Specializing in Unique Edible Plants, Permaculture Gardens, and Homesteading. The blog posts can be viewed at GreatEscapeFarms.com.  This week we cover topics from the week of 12/28/15 including; A Temperate Climate Season Contrast, Building A Plant Propagation Bed – Part 3, Gooseberry (Ribes) – A Unique Edible, Oh Deer.

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Epi016 – Great Escape Podcast Week of 12/21/15

Epi016 – Great Escape Podcast Week of 12/21/15

Great Escape Podcast

Great Escape Podcast

Great Escape Podcast is an audio version of the blog posts from Great Escape Farms, Specializing in Unique Edible Plants, Permaculture Gardens, and Homesteading. The blog posts can be viewed at GreatEscapeFarms.com.  This week we cover topics from the week of 12/21/15 including; Update of Progress on the Farm 12_21_15 – More Propagation Beds, Building a Propagation Bed – Part 2, The Edible Dandelion, My Hugelkultur Bed, December 25th – Merry Christmas – no blog post today.

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Epi015 – Great Escape Podcast Week of 12/14/15

Epi015 – Great Escape Podcast Week of 12/14/15

Great Escape Podcast

Great Escape Podcast

Great Escape Podcast is an audio version of the blog posts from Great Escape Farms, Specializing in Unique Edible Plants, Permaculture Gardens, and Homesteading. The blog posts can be viewed at GreatEscapeFarms.com.  This week we cover topics from the week of 12/14/15 including; Update on weekend work and the Maryland Gardens, The Hardy Banana, So what is all this Forest Garden Stuff, Blackberry – A wonderful plant to propagate, Gaia’s Garden Book Review.

If you would like to subscribe to this podcast on iTunes, you can do so by clicking on Great Escape Podcast.

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Epi014 – Great Escape Podcast Week of 12/7/15

Epi014 – Great Escape Podcast Week of 12/7/15

Great Escape Podcast

Great Escape Podcast

Great Escape Podcast is an audio version of the blog posts from Great Escape Farms, Specializing in Unique Edible Plants, Permaculture Gardens, and Homesteading. The blog posts can be viewed at GreatEscapeFarms.com.  This week we cover topics from the week of 12/7/15 including; Building a Plant Propagation Bed – Part 1 of 3, The Almond Tree, Beneficial insects – Rove Beetles and Fireflies, Black Locust Tree as a Fertilizer, Permaculture Voices – A Podcast Review.

If you would like to subscribe to this podcast on iTunes, you can do so by clicking on Great Escape Podcast.

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Protecting Plants From Deer

Protecting Plants From Deer

Protecting Plants From Deer

How does one go about protecting plants from deer?  They will eat your fruit, plants, and garden produce before you get a chance to reach for them.

Oh Deer

Oh Deer

The whitetail deer is a nasty four-legged apple eating machine.  At my orchard in West Virginia, they show up about the time the first apple ripens.  They stick around until the last apple falls and then they decide that they liked the place so much the are going to stick around and eat the apple trees as well.

The deer are very determined adversaries.  I have tried numerous different ways to get them out and keep them out of the orchard.  Best case scenario, I scare them out of the yard for fifteen minutes.  I have come up with a few things that work in some smaller areas as well as some things I’ve seen online I’ll be trying next year.  But first, the basics of what drives the varmints and why I want them gone.

The whitetail deer is native to North, Central, and South Americas. The deer’s coat is a reddish-brown in the spring and summer and turns to a grey-brown throughout the fall and winter. They have a white underside to their tails.  They raise their tails when alarmed to warn other surrounding deer of the issue. White-tailed deer’s horizontally slit pupils allow for good night vision and color vision during the day.

Damage

Deer Damage

Deer Damage

Deer damage plants in two ways.  By eating the fruit and plants and by marking or scraping the bark off of small diameter trees.  Deer eat legumes, small trees, acorns, corn, fruit such as apples and they love young shoots.  They will also eat hay, grass, and clover.  The white-tailed deer is a ruminant, which means it has a four-chambered stomach.  This allows it to browse heavily and then go off elsewhere and digest later.

As if eating fruit and plants isn’t bad enough, they also tear up trees that they do not eat.  The bucks make rubs and scrapes on small diameter trees.  This is to either rub off the velvety covering on their antlers or to mark territory and tell the does that there is a male present.  Often times they will scrape all the way around a small tree removing the bark, which kills a small tree.  The picture titled Deer Damage shows a tree that was recently killed by a deer.  Even though it still has green leaves on top, it will not survive because the bark has been rubbed off all the way around.  I have another picture at the bottom of this post that shows a tree that was damaged, but will survive because the bark was not taken off all the way around.

Protecting Plants From Deer – Deterrents

Below are some deterrents for protecting plants from deer that I found online as well as some that I have tried myself.  Remember, deer are excellent fence-jumpers, and their fear of motion and sounds meant to scare them away is soon dulled.

  • Daffodils – it is said that deer do not like daffodils. I have not tried this yet, but will be including daffodils in some of my plant guilds specifically to keep deer away.
  • Fence shrub combination – If you have a fence and line shrubs up against that fence, you may keep the deer away. The thought is that deer can jump high, but not high and far.  So if you have a four-foot-high fence that has a shrub up against it and the shrub is four or five-foot-wide, the deer will not be able to jump over it.  This may not be practical for large acreage, but may work for a smaller property.
  • Protecting Plants From Deer - Fenced Tree

    Protecting Plants From Deer – Fenced Tree

    Enclosed area – In theory, deer do not like enclosed areas. The only problem I have with this is what constitutes a small area?  I have a garden that is 40×40 foot.  The deer stayed away from this garden all summer long.  But then they discovered that I had ripe pumpkins in the garden.  They were eating a whole pumpkin in a night.  So 40×40 foot is too big.

  • The picture titled “Fenced Tree” shows a shrub that is wrapped in a fence.  The deer can not cause damage to this tree, because they can not reach it.  This is a very effective way of keeping a tree alive, but it gets expensive if you have a lot of trees and shrubs.  I have a picture at the bottom of this post that shows my first rendition of this method using recycled parts.
  • 8-foot fence – It is said that an 8-foot high fence will keep them out. I have too much land and not enough budget to put an 8-foot fence around the farm.
  • electric fence – This did work for me this year. I used a single strand string type electric fence this year.  I basically made rows of the string so that if they jumped in, they would be bound to hit the fence at some point.  This seemed to work well.
  • Wrap with nets or tubes – I don’t know about the nets. I can see that a tube could keep deer away if the tube was high enough to protect the plant from rubs and scrapes.  I just bought 10 Tubex tubes from www.treeprotectionsupply.com/ and will give you a product review in the spring of 2016 on how well the products worked.
  • Deer repellents – most smell, need to be re-applied after a rain.
  • String a line of monofilament (fish string) around your garden or plants. – This supposedly confuses deer and drives them away.
  • This Old House posted the following: “Some gardeners swear by hanging fabric softener strips and/or wrapped bars of soap from trees, both of which can confuse a deer’s sense of smell. Others point to using hot pepper sprays, garlic and rotten egg mixtures, ammonia-soaked rags, and bags of hair and/or blood meal around the garden for the same reason. As with commercial repellents, the trick is to switch things up, learning by trial and error, for maximum efficiency.” (Source:www.thisoldhouse.com/toh/photos/0,,20368362_20784353,00.html) I’m sorry. I do not want bars of soap hanging from a hundred apple trees or the smell of rotten egg mixture in my back yard.
  • It has been said that the scent of Dogs can drive deer away. I have found this not to be true.  I have had my dogs out playing in the orchard all morning.  I brought them in to feed them and by the time the dogs went back outside, there were deer in the orchard munching on apples.
  • Motion activated sprinklers – I have not tried this one yet, but it sounds promising. The thought is that a passing deer sets off the motion detector, which sets off the sprinkler.  The sprinkler is one of those old style sprinklers that makes a lot of noise.  The combination of sudden noise and getting hit with a stream of water scares them away.  I’ll be trying this one next year.  Hey – you are even watering the garden when the deer show up. 🙂 I’ve included an Amazon link below for the one I look to purchase.  Here is the Amazon link.

  • Installing motion lights has been suggested. This is a no go.  I have motion lights on my house facing the orchard and when the wind blows the branches of the trees, it often sets off the motion lights.  Sometimes I think I hear the deer thanking me for the extra light to find the apples on the ground.
  • An online source suggested turning a radio on to static noise between radio stations. This doesn’t sound like a long term solution to me.

Do you have any suggestions on Protecting Plants From Deer not listed above?  Please let me know about them by writing a comment below.

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More Damage

More Damage

Protecting Plants From Deer - First Fenced Tree

Protecting Plants From Deer – First Fenced Tree

Gooseberry Plant Information – A Unique Edible

Gooseberry Plant Information – A Unique Edible

Gooseberry Plant Information – A Unique Edible

This post, Gooseberry Plant Information, provides you with information on how to grow, propagate and eat this medicinal plant.

Gooseberry

Gooseberry

Gooseberry is a unique edible in the Ribes Family that includes currant. It is a deciduous shrubs or bush growing 5 feet in height and width, thickly set with sharp spines. It is native to Europe, northern Africa, and Asia.  It is hardy to USDA zones 3-7

The leaves are alternate, single, deeply lobed, and glossy dark green (European types), or pale to gray-green and sometimes finely pubescent (American types)

The bell-shaped flowers are produced, singly or in pairs, from the groups of rounded, deeply crenated 3 or 5 lobed leaves. The flowers are self-fertile and pollinated by wind and insects, including bees.

They grow best in summer humid, cool regions with great winter chilling. Gooseberries like morning sun, afternoon part-shade and buoyant air circulation. Leaf size and number are reduced under heat or light stress, and are easily burned by intense sunlight. Plants collapse quickly when soil or air temperature exceeds 85° F. A thick mulch of some organic material also helps keep the soil cool. Sandy soils are less suitable for gooseberries because they dry out too fast.  Keep the plants watered all season, since they will not regenerate buds or leaves lost from drought stress.

Pruning should be carried out to allow light in and give the new growth for next year’s branches an opportunity to grow. Allow stems to grow for 4-5 years, then selectively remove oldest stems to make room for new shoots. Heavy nitrogen composting must be avoided as too much nitrogen will produce extensive growth and weaken the bush.

Like most Ribes, the gooseberry is an alternate host for white pine blister rust, which can cause serious damage to American white pines.

Fruit

Gooseberry Plant Information - A Unique Edible - Gooseberries

Gooseberry Plant Information – A Unique Edible – Gooseberries

The fruit is a berry with many minute seeds at the center. Fruit is produced on lateral spurs and on the previous year’s shoots. Berries generally drop when overripe. A mature bush will produce between eight and ten pounds of fruit per year. The color of the berries is usually green, but there are red (to purple), yellow, and white variants

Edible

The fruit can be eaten directly from the bush.  It is also used to make desserts, pies, and flavor for sodas, waters, and milk.  It can also be made into wines, teas, Jams, dried fruit, and pickling.

Propagation

Gooseberry can be propagated by seed, cuttings, and tipping.  Take hardwood cutting in early fall, even before all the leaves have dropped. The presence of a few leaves actually enhances rooting. Make the cuttings about a foot long, but do not include tip growth, dip the base in hormone and pot in ordinary soil. Cuttings planted in the autumn will take root quickly and can begin to bear fruit within a few years. Those growing from seeds will rapidly produce healthy heavily yielding bushes. Seeds require moist stratification, just above freezing, for three to four months.

The plants usually bear fruit in 5 years from seed and 2 years from cuttings.

Medicinal

“The fruit is laxative. Stewed unripe gooseberries are used as a spring tonic to cleanse the system. The leaves have been used in the treatment of gravel. An infusion taken before the monthly periods is said to be a useful tonic for growing girls. The leaves contain tannin and have been used as an astringent to treat dysentery and wounds.” *

(Source:www.naturalmedicinalherbs.net/herbs/r/ribes-uva-crispa=gooseberry.php)

 

Recipe

Gooseberry Pie

Ingredients

  • 3 cups fresh gooseberries
  • 2 cups white sugar
  • 3 tablespoons quick-cooking tapioca
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1 recipe pastry for a 9 inch double crust pie
  • 2 tablespoons milk
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons white sugar

Directions

  1. Stem and rinse berries.
  2. Crush 1/2 cup berries in the bottom of a saucepan. Combine sugar, tapioca, and salt; mix with crushed berries. Cook and stir until mixture boils. Cook for 2 more minutes. Remove from heat, and add in remaining whole berries.
  3. Pour fruit filling into pastry. Adjust top crust , cut slits for escape of steam. Brush with milk and sugar.
  4. Bake at 400 degrees F (205 degrees C) for 35 minutes.

(Source:allrecipes.com/recipe/12192/gooseberry-pie-i/)

 

*These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration.  This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

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Please comment below on this post, Gooseberry Plant Information – A Unique Edible, and let us know what you think of the article.

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Building A Plant Propagation Bed – Part 3

Building A Plant Propagation Bed – Part 3

Building A Plant Propagation Bed – Part 3

Building A Plant Propagation Bed – Part 3 is the third and final part of my Building a Plant Propagation Bed series.  Please see the links below for parts 1 and 2.

Click on this link for: Building A Plant Propagation Bed – Pt1

Click on this link for: Building A Plant Propagation Bed – Part 2

In part 1 and 2 of the series “Building a Plant Propagation Bed”, I covered how to make a plant propagation bed that will keep deer, dogs, feral cats, squirrels, rabbits, and ground hogs out of the bed.  (Ground hogs can still tunnel into the beds.)  If you build a bed as described in parts 1 and 2 you are good to go with winter hardwood cuttings.  You are NOT good to go for summer softwood or semi-softwood cuttings though.  You will need to shade your plants and to keep them moist so they don’t dry out from the hot summer sun. Part 3 of this series will cover how to turn the winter bed from parts 1 and 2 into a thriving summer plant propagation system.

The Problem

There are two problems with summer propagation beds that you don’t have in the winter propagation beds.  First, the summer sun will beat down and cook or sunburn your plants.  In the winter the sun is low in the sky and you don’t have to worry about sunburn (in northern hemisphere temperate climates at least). Second, the leaves on the plants will “perspire” and dry the plants out in the summer.  The second issue is exacerbated by the hot summer heat.  In the winter, deciduous trees do not have leaves so the perspiration factor is a non-issue.

Building A Plant Propagation Bed – Part 3 – The Solution

So how do we solve the two problems above?  We provide shade and moisture.  There problem solved.  🙂  This article will talk about these two issues and show you how to solve the issues in detail.

In the picture below titled “Shade Cloth On” you see that I have a propagation bed that is protected from the full on afternoon sun and there is some plumbing shown.  This is a 4′ x 8′ x 8″ bed with concrete sand in it. I planted softwood cuttings in the bed in early June.  This picture was taken at the end of June.  With softwood cuttings, they have leaves on them already.  I will do another article in the future on exactly how to plant softwood vs. hardwood cuttings.  In the picture titled “Shade Cloth Pulled Back” you can see the bed a little better.  I pulled the shade cloth back only for the purpose of this photo, then I replaced it.

Shade Cloth On

Shade Cloth On

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Shade Cloth Pulled Back

Shade Cloth Pulled Back

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

For the purposes of comparison, I have included two pictures below of the same be with winter hardwood cuttings in it.  The first picture, titled “Hardwood Cuttings”, shows the cuttings in the bed.  They are 1″ x 1″ apart.  I found that this was too close, so I went 1″ x 2″ with the summer softwood cuttings.  The issue I had with them being too close was not that the roots got tangled.  That happened slightly, but they were easy enough to sepearte.  The real issue was I was experimenting and each row had different plants in them.  When I was digging them out, I kept getting the plants mixed up.  This is unacceptable in the nursery business.  So I now have the plants were spaced 1″ apart in a row and the rows are 2″ apart.

Hardwood Cuttings

Hardwood Cuttings

Hardwood Cuttings Covered

Hardwood Cuttings Covered

The next photo, titled “Hardwood Cuttings Covered”, shows the same hardwood cuttings covered with a frame that is covered by chicken wire.  The frame legs are about 18″ high giving 10″ above the top of the propagation bed.  The purpose of the cover was to keep my dogs, the squirrels, and feral cats out of the sand.  This setup kept the critters out, but when the plants started growing in the spring, they quickly grew up into the chicken wire.  It was not tall enough.

Another problem with the chicken wire is it was not strong enough to put shade cloth on.  I sagged in the middle without shade cloth on it.  With shade cloth, the center would have touched the sand.  I made the cover the way I did so it would be easily removed when I wanted to access the plants inside.  If I made it sturdier, it would have become a good bit heavier and it would have been difficult to lift off.  I discovered that I had to go with a permanent structure in the summer that was higher off the ground and sturdy enough to put a shade cloth on.  That is when I came up with the design pictured at the top of this article.

The permanent structure with shade cloth pictured above does everything I need, except keep the animals out. Since this is at my residence in suburbia, I don’t have to worry about deer and groundhogs.  I do have to worry about my dogs, feral cats, and squirrels.  What worked for me this summer was filling the bed up fully with plants and pots. That kept the dogs and feral cats out.  The squirrels would still go into the bed, but the dogs running in the yard seem to keep the squirrels on the run and they didn’t mess with the bed this past year.

The above experiments were a wonderful lesson on what works and what doesn’t.  Out at the farm, I have to worry about deer and groundhogs.  My experiments in suburbia would not deter them.  That is why I use the method demonstrated in part 1 and 2 of this series.  It keeps the animals out, is strong enough to hold a shade cloth in the summer and is big enough for me to put a door on and to walk in to, so I do not need it to be a removable structure.

Building A Plant Propagation Bed – Part 3 -Shade Cloth

The shade cloth shown above is 90% UV block shade cloth.  That is too much.  It worked for me, but it is recommended to use 50% shade cloth.  If you’ll notice in the pictures above, my shade cloth only covers the top.  The sides do allow sun to enter.  This was good in my case because I have dappled sun from that angle.  In a full sun situation, that much sun for any period of time is too much and could easily burn the plants.

Note: in the videos below I stated that the shade cloths were 70%.  That is incorrect.  I just checked my orders from amazon and they were for 90% UV block shad cloth.

Building A Plant Propagation Bed – Part 3 -Plumbing

Now for the plumbing.  The plumbing for my system is mostly shown below in the picture titled “Plumbing Closeup”.

Plumbing Closeup

Plumbing Closeup

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Shown in the picture are: a 3/4″ black hose coming in from the right hand side.  That goes into a water filter.  The water filter is used to filter out the chlorine from my public water system.  At the farm I have well water so no chlorine.  However, I will still use the filter to take out sediment and minerals that would clog my mist heads.

From the filter I go into a PVC T connector.  The pipe in the up direction goes to a valve that is turned off and then a green sprinkler valve and into another hose.  This section was planned for a second bed that I never put in, so the valve stayed off and it was not used at all this year.

The pipe coming out on the left side of the T connector goes to a green sprinkler valve.  You can see on the green sprinkler valve that it has a solenoid with wires on it.  The wires go off to a timer that opens the sprinkler valve from time to time.  I’ll explain more on that later.

The picture below titled “Plumbing” shows the same setup from a different angle.  Coming out of the sprinkler valve to the left, you will see a 4-foot section of PVC that has a valve on the end.  The valve on the end is used so I can drain the water out of the pipe in the winter so the freezing weather won’t burst the pipe on me.  The valve is kept in the closed position during normal use, as shown.

Building A Plant Propagation Bed - Part 3 - Plumbing

Building A Plant Propagation Bed – Part 3 – Plumbing

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

If you notice, about 8 inches to the left of the sprinkler valve, there is a small black tube coming out of the PVC.  This tube goes over to the Dramm Stxx sprinkler head. The Dramm Stix is a misting type sprinkler head that is on top of wires that plug into the ground.  The wires come in varying lengths.  I believe mine are 30″.

To plumb the Dramm Stix, you drill a 3/8″ hole into the PVC and the black tube fits snugly into the hole in the PVC.  The theory is that the tube is snug enough to hold the tube in the pipe.  That didn’t work for me.  I had too much water pressure.  So I added a 25PSI water regulator to the setup hoping to solve the issue.  The water regulator is pictured in the pictures “25lb PSI Regulator” and “Water Regulator”.

25lb PSI Regulator

25lb PSI Regulator

Water Regulator

Water Regulator

The water regulator did not solve the issue.  It only prolonged the time in between the time that I shot the black tube out of the PVC and created a gieser.

I ultimately ended up using electrical tape and taping the black tube into the PVC.  I did figure “8s” around the tube and the PVC.  Once I did this it held like a champ for the reminder of the summer.

I included a picture below with the electrical tape holding the black tube into the PVC.  Imagine that you are going to make a figure-8 around the black tube and the black tube is the center of the figure-8.  I also used electrical tape to tie the black tube and the PVC together about 6-inches away from the point that I did figure-8s.  This is to relieve any pressure on the joint where the figure-8 is from movement of the tube caused by wind or anything else.

Figure8s

Figure8s

Building A Plant Propagation Bed – Part 3 – Sprinkler Valve

The whole goal of the intermittent mist system is to be fully automatic.  You do not want a system that you will have to interact with constantly.  The system described here will be fully automatic and mist the plants for ten seconds at ten minute intervals.  And it will only do it during the heat of the day.  You do not want to water your plants all night long or you will risk causing disease and other problems.  Generally you want the system to start watering around sunrise and to stop watering around sunset.

In order to automatically control the water flow you need to add a sprinkler valve.  I used the orbit product lines for both the sprinkler valve and the wire to the sprinkler valve.  They are depicted in the pictures “Sprinkler Valve” and “Sprinkler Wire”.

The sprinkler valve is controlled by a black solenoid on top of the sprinkler valve.  The solenoid is kind of an electrical switch that opens and closes when electricity is applied.  We will use a wire to connect the sprinkler valve to a controller unit.  We will talk about the controller unit a little later in this article.

Sprinkler Valve

Sprinkler Valve

Sprinkler Valve PVC

Sprinkler Valve PVC

The sprinkler valve has has 3/4-inch female ends on both sides of the device.  I went to the local hardware store and picked up some fittings that would covert each end to 3/4-inch PVC.  The fittings that I added are shown in the photo titled “Sprinkler Valve PVC”.

This allowed me to glue a 3/4-inch PVC pipe to the fitting and then I could make the pipe as long as I needed.  Then I drill into the PVC pipe and hook up the black tube to the Dramm Stix at the point I needed.

For a single bed, the PVC does not need to be that long, but when you are doing large beds or multiple beds, you will likely want longer pipes.

If all of the mist heads are going to be running for the same amount of time and you have enough water pressure to run many mist heads, you can use just one sprinkler valve to run many mist heads plugged into the same PVC.

Sprinkler Wire

Sprinkler Wire

Waterproof Wire Nuts

Waterproof Wire Nuts

I used the sprinkler wire shown in the picture titled “Sprinkler Wire” and the wire nuts shown in the picture titled “Waterproof Wire Nuts”.  The wire is designed to be run outside and can tolerate rain, being put underground, or in direct sunlight.  The wirenuts are designed to be used outside and have a jell in them to protect the electrical connections from the elements.

The sprinkler wire shown here is multiple conductor so if you do need to program multiple different sprinkler valves for some reason, then you can run all of the connections in one single cable.

The majority of the products talked about here came from either the local hardware store or from Amazon.  I’ve included web links below to most products talked about on this post.

Building A Plant Propagation Bed – Part 3 – Indoor Irrigation and Propagation Seconds Operation Controller

The piece that really makes that fully automatic for you is the Indoor Irrigation and Propagation Seconds Operation Controller.  The unit that I have and the unit depicted is the “Galcon 8056S AC-6S 6-Station Indoor Irrigation and Propagation Seconds Operation Controller”.  It is shown in the picture titled “Galcon”.

Galcon

Galcon

There are many different types shown online at Amazon.  This is the model that they have used at two different propagation classes that I have been to and I like the unit.  The video below shows you how to program this unit and may or may not work for other units.

This particular unit will allow you to individually program 6 different sprinkler valves with different settings.  It lets you program for each day of the week, allows you to control when a program starts, now or in the future, and lets you program based on time of day.

I have mine set up to give a 10-second burst of water to the mist head.  It will do this every 10 minutes from 6AM to 9PM.  These times are approximately my summer solstice sunrise and sunset times.  You may need to vary these times based on how far north you are.  You may also have to program more than a 10-second burst if you are in a much hotter climate and you may need to adjust the 10-minutes based on how quickly the water evaporates off of the leaves.  Basically, you do not want the leaves to fully dry out.

Building A Plant Propagation Bed – Part 3 – YouTube Videos

Below are several YouTube videos.  The first shows what I plan to do in order to make my propagation beds ready for summer.  The second shows the plumbing system put together at my Maryland residence.  The third shows how to program the Galcon controller.

Building A Plant Propagation Bed – Part 3 – Shade Cloth

Building A Plant Propagation Bed – Part 3 – Plumbing

Building A Plant Propagation Bed – Part 3 – Galcon Programming

 

Building A Plant Propagation Bed – Part 3 – Product Links

Below are links to online sources to purchase the above equipment.  I do get a small referral fee if you purchase the Amazon products and it helps support this blog.  It does not cost you any more to purchase from these links.

(Note: I did not buy the below shade cloth.  I plan on buying the below shade cloth and will give a report on it in 2016.)

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Epi013 – Great Escape Podcast Week of 11/30/15

Epi013 – Great Escape Podcast Week of 11/30/15

Great Escape Podcast

Great Escape Podcast

Great Escape Podcast is an audio version of the blog posts from Great Escape Farms, Specializing in Unique Edible Plants, Permaculture Gardens, and Homesteading. The blog posts can be viewed at GreatEscapeFarms.com.  This week we cover topics from the week of 11/30/15 including; Plant Guild – A Permaculture Technique, Mimosa Tree for Nitrogen Fixation and Beauty, Other Nurseries – Rare Seeds, Paw Paw – A Unique Edible Tree, Wild Berries & Herbs – Phone App Review.

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Epi012 – Great Escape Podcast Covering Companion Planting

Epi012 – Great Escape Podcast Covering Companion Planting

Great Escape Podcast

Great Escape Podcast

Great Escape Podcast is an audio version of the blog posts from Great Escape Farms, Specializing in Unique Edible Plants, Permaculture Gardens, and Homesteading. The blog posts can be viewed at GreatEscapeFarms.com. This episode covers companion planting. The companion planting article was posted on Great Escape Farms blog post on November 24th 2015.

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Epi011 – Great Escape Podcast Week of 11/23/15

Epi011 – Great Escape Podcast Week of 11/23/15

Great Escape Podcast

Great Escape Podcast

Great Escape Podcast is an audio version of the blog posts from Great Escape Farms, Specializing in Unique Edible Plants, Permaculture Gardens, and Homesteading. The blog posts can be viewed at GreatEscapeFarms.com.  This week we cover topics from the week of 11/23/15 including; Viburnum Blackhaw Another Unique Edible Plant, Companion Planting, Siberian Pea Shrub – A Permaculture Plant, Thanksgiving and Native American Farmers, Spicebush – A wild edible.

If you would like to subscribe to this podcast on iTunes, you can do so by clicking on Great Escape Podcast.

Click on the icon below for other RSS feed options.